[ REVIEW ]

 

 

 

The Same River Twice (2003)

(ٴѧպ)

 

 


From peyote to prozac, a sensitive portrait of five former hippies now approaching middle age.

Twenty-five years ago, Robb Moss and his fellow whitewater river-rafting guides took one last 35-day trip down the Colorado River. They were freewheeling, drug-taking and naked—especially naked. Moss captured the trip in his striking, beautiful, vérité-style documentary film Riverdogs. Everything on their excursion was done communally, right down to debating when to stop. And, during their final conversations one got the feeling that, more than simply leaving the river, they were leaving an era as well—the ’70s were just about over, man. Leaving the river and their floating community, everyone put on clothes. Some even donned ties. Now an established filmmaker, as well as a teacher at Harvard, Moss has returned to his friends, to revisit their old trip together and document their current lives in more established environs. Thankfully, these aren’t the clichéd tales of hippy sellouts. Instead, Moss’s friends have negotiated their desires to live well and freely while embracing philosophies of respect for each other, the environment and the communities where they live. Through their stories we receive a powerful and contemplative vision of how social pressure, time and our physical beings inflect our choices and shape our lives.

ҧ

Birmingham Sidewalk Moving Picture Festival
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
2003 Won Best Documentary Robb Moss
 
Independent Spirit Awards
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
2004 Nominated Truer Than Fiction Award Robb Moss
 
Nashville Film Festival
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
2003 Won Best Documentary Feature Robb Moss
 
Sundance Film Festival
Year Result Award Category/Recipient(s)
2003 Nominated Grand Jury Prize DocumentaryRobb Moss
 
 

 

 

 





äͧʹ..ͧ仴٫ԤѺ